Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Richards v. Octane Environmental, LLC

United States District Court, N.D. West Virginia

December 10, 2019

RICK RICHARDS and ERNEST RICHARDS, II, Plaintiffs/ Counter Defendants,
v.
OCTANE ENVIRONMENTAL, LLC, an Ohio limited liability company, TERENCE SEIKEL, CRAIG STACY, and JOSEPH SEIKEL, Defendants/Counter Claimants/ Third-Party Plaintiff/Counter Defendant,
v.
JASON RICHARDS, AMANDA HUNT, AARON GILES, and JACOB RICHARDS, Third-Party Defendants/Counter Claimants against Octane Environmental, LLC.

          MEMORANDUM OPINION AND ORDER DENYING MOTION TO DISMISS THIRD-PARTY COMPLAINT AGAINST AMANDA HUNT, AARON GILES, AND JACOB RICHARDS [ECF NO. 80]

          THOMAS S. KLEEH UNITED STATES DISTRICT JUDGE

         Pending before the Court is a Motion to Dismiss the Third-Party Complaint against Amanda Hunt, Aaron Giles, and Jacob Richards [ECF No. 80]. For the reasons discussed below, the Court denies the Motion.

         I. PROCEDURAL HISTORY

         On July 17, 2018, Rick Richards and Ernest Richards, II (together, “Plaintiffs”) filed separate but related suits in the Circuit Court of Harrison County, West Virginia, against the Defendants, Octane Environmental, LLC (“Octane”), Terence Seikel, Craig Stacy, and Joseph Seikel (together, “Defendants”). On August 16, 2018, the actions were removed to the Northern District of West Virginia. ECF No. 1. On August 23, 2018, Defendants filed an Answer to the Complaint. ECF No. 7. On November 15, 2018, the Honorable Irene M. Keeley, United States District Judge, entered an order consolidating the two cases through the pretrial conference and designating 1:18-CV-158 as the lead case. ECF No. 17. On December 3, 2018, the case was transferred to the Honorable Thomas S. Kleeh, United States District Judge.

         On January 16, 2019, the Court granted Defendants leave to file a Third-Party Complaint against Amanda Hunt, Aaron Giles, Jacob Richards, and Jason Richards. ECF Nos. 36, 37. The Third-Party Complaints are docketed at ECF Nos. 38 and 39 in CM/ECF. On April 5, 2019, Third-Party Defendants Amanda Hunt, Aaron Giles, and Jacob Richards moved to dismiss the Third-Party Complaint against them [ECF No. 80]. This Motion is ripe for consideration and is the subject of this Memorandum Opinion and Order.

         II. FACTUAL BACKGROUND

         In the Third-Party Complaint against Amanda Hunt, Aaron Giles, and Jacob Richards [ECF Nos. 38, 39], [1] Octane alleges the following set of facts, which the Court regards as true for purposes of the Motion.

         On April 1, 2018, Octane implemented an employee handbook. Third-Party Compl., ECF Nos. 38 and 39, at ¶ 12. Section four (4) of the handbook provides, “Employees may not use company systems in a manner that is unlawful, wasteful of company resources, or unreasonably compromises employee productivity or the overall integrity or stability of the company's systems.” Id. ¶ 13. Nothing in the handbook authorizes employees to delete information and/or files from Octane-provided laptop computers. Id. ¶ 14.

         Amanda Hunt worked at Octane from April 24, 2017, to May 12, 2018, as an Office Manager. Id. ¶ 15. Her responsibilities included billing and invoicing Octane's customers. Id. Octane issued to her a laptop computer for work purposes. Id. ¶ 16. Aaron Giles worked for Octane from June 2, 2017, to May 13, 2018. Id. ¶ 17. He worked as a Field Supervisor and then an Office Supervisor, and his responsibilities included billing and invoicing Octane's customers. Id. Aaron Giles was also issued a work laptop. Id. ¶ 18. Jacob Richards worked for Octane from April 28, 2017, to May 14, 2018, as an Office Assistant. Id. ¶ 19. His responsibilities included collecting and reviewing credit card expense reports. Id. He was also issued a work laptop. Id.

         On or about May 11, 2018, Rick Richards instructed and/or advised Amanda Hunt, Aaron Giles, and Jacob Richards to delete data and/or information from their Octane-provided laptops. Id. ¶ 22. This information included confidential, proprietary, trade secret information and critical information necessary for Octane to run its business. Id. On or about May 11, 2018, Amanda Hunt deleted confidential and/or trade secret information from her Octane-provided laptop, including customer information, vendor information, and financial records. Id. ¶ 23. On or about the same day, Aaron Giles deleted confidential and/or trade secret information from his Octane-provided laptop, including logistical information necessary for Octane's business operations. Id. ¶ 24. On or about the same day, Jacob Richards deleted confidential and/or trade secret information from his Octane-provided laptop, including credit card expense reports for Amanda Hunt, Aaron Giles, Rick Richards, Ernest Richards, and several other individuals. Id. ¶ 25. After ending their employment, Amanda Hunt, Aaron Giles, and Jacob Richards began working for one of Octane's competitors “days later.” Id. ¶ 26.

         III. STANDARD OF REVIEW

         Rule 12(b)(6) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure allows a defendant to move for dismissal upon the ground that a complaint does not “state a claim upon which relief can be granted.” In ruling on a motion to dismiss, a court “must accept as true all of the factual allegations contained in the complaint.” Anderson v. Sara Lee Corp., 508 F.3d 181, 188 (4th Cir. 2007) (quoting Erickson v. Pardus, 551 U.S. 89, 94 (2007)). A court is “not bound to accept as true a legal conclusion couched as a factual allegation.” Papasan v. Allain, 478 U.S. 265, 286 (1986).

         A motion to dismiss under Rule 12(6)(b) tests the “legal sufficiency of a complaint.” Francis v. Giacomelli, 588 F.3d 186, 192 (4th Cir. 2009). A court should dismiss a complaint if it does not contain “enough facts to state a claim to relief that is plausible on its face.” Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544, 570 (2007). Plausibility exists “when the plaintiff pleads factual content that allows the court to draw the reasonable inference that the defendant is liable for the misconduct alleged.” Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 556 U.S. 662, 678 (2009). The factual allegations “must be enough to raise a right to relief above a speculative level.” Twombly, 550 U.S. at 545. The facts must constitute more than “a formulaic recitation of the elements of a cause of action.” Id. at 555. A motion to dismiss “does not resolve contests surrounding the facts, the merits of a claim, or the applicability of defenses.” Republican Party of N.C. v. Martin, 980 F.2d 942, 952 (4th Cir. 1992).

         IV. ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.